Tags: the monkees

"Kindness in words creates confidence. Kindness in thinking creates profoundness. Kindness in giving creates love."

— Thích Nhất Hạnh  (via whataboutprom)

(Source: purplebuddhaproject, via whataboutprom)

ladiesagainsthumanity:

It could be a federal holiday called Actually Day and the president would give a Mansplanation Proclamation and we’d all get paid 85 cents on the dollar as a special treat. 

MANSPLANATION PROCLAMATION.

ladiesagainsthumanity:

It could be a federal holiday called Actually Day and the president would give a Mansplanation Proclamation and we’d all get paid 85 cents on the dollar as a special treat. 

MANSPLANATION PROCLAMATION.

siamesemeg:

bluemoonalto:

60s-tork-all-monkees:

spongebobdylan:

All the monkees running gags~

this made me laugh so hard I couldn’t breathe omg

I LOVE THIS VIDEO SO MUCH! The only thing missing is “Rhubarb, rhubarb” I’ve got to show it to my dude, tho I know he won’t laugh. Damn it, he lovers Homer and South Park. Now why can’t I get him to laugh at the Monkees?   No kidding, one of my all-time fave videos.

Hey, Siamesemeg!  Your video is getting some Tumblr-love. 

Holy cannoli. Thanks for letting me know!

How fun to see it come back around to me with so much love. Glad people are loving it as much as I loved making it.

This video is making me famous! I got to talk about it on the awesome Zilch Monkeescast! It was so much fun. Thanks, Ken!

http://zilchmonkeescast.blogspot.com/2014/07/zilch-7-royal-flush-commentary-al.html

(Source: dazedginger)

bluemoonalto:

I must have done well enough on my first Zilch guest spot, they invited me back for the episode discussion!  Here I’m on the podcast with Craig Cohen and Jeff Hulit, for the scene-by-scene live commentary on Royal Flush. 

I’m on this episode, too! Ken from the Zilch Podcast enjoyed my Running Gag Supercut video so much, he had me on to talk about it! 

futurejournalismproject:

Hacking Politics with Browser Extensions & Twitter Bots
Sixteen-year-old Nick Rubin created a browser extension that shows who’s funding US politicians. Called Greenhouse, the extension pulls data from OpenSecrets.org so that when reading a story you can mouse over politicians’ names to get a quick overview of what industries have donated to them. Additional data pulled from Reform.to shows if the politician supports campaign finance reform.
Over in the political satire corner of the Web, this Chrome Extension will play Entry of the Gladiators when an article about Toronto mayor Rob Ford loads in your browser. Entry of the Gladiators? You might know it better as the clown song that’s played at the circus. Sounds like this.
Meantime, two bots on Twitter are fighting the transparency fight.
One, @PhrmaEdits, tweets whenever anonymous edits to Wikipedia are made that can be traced back to a pharmaceutical’s IP address. The bot is based on @CongressEdits by Ed Summers, that does the same.
As Summers explains on his personal site, the idea behind @CongressEdits has gone international:

The simplicity of combining Wikipedia and Twitter in this way immediately struck me as a potentially useful transparency tool. So using my experience on a previous side project I quickly put together a short program that listens to all major language Wikipedias for anonymous edits from Congressional IP address ranges… and tweets them.
In less than 48 hours the @congressedits Twitter account had more than 3,000 followers. My friend Nick set up gccaedits for Canada using the same software … and @wikiAssemblee (France) and @RiksdagWikiEdit (Sweden) were quick to follow.

Image: Best Web Browser Extension by I Can Barely Draw. Select to embiggen.

futurejournalismproject:

Hacking Politics with Browser Extensions & Twitter Bots

Sixteen-year-old Nick Rubin created a browser extension that shows who’s funding US politicians. Called Greenhouse, the extension pulls data from OpenSecrets.org so that when reading a story you can mouse over politicians’ names to get a quick overview of what industries have donated to them. Additional data pulled from Reform.to shows if the politician supports campaign finance reform.

Over in the political satire corner of the Web, this Chrome Extension will play Entry of the Gladiators when an article about Toronto mayor Rob Ford loads in your browser. Entry of the Gladiators? You might know it better as the clown song that’s played at the circus. Sounds like this.

Meantime, two bots on Twitter are fighting the transparency fight.

One, @PhrmaEdits, tweets whenever anonymous edits to Wikipedia are made that can be traced back to a pharmaceutical’s IP address. The bot is based on @CongressEdits by Ed Summers, that does the same.

As Summers explains on his personal site, the idea behind @CongressEdits has gone international:

The simplicity of combining Wikipedia and Twitter in this way immediately struck me as a potentially useful transparency tool. So using my experience on a previous side project I quickly put together a short program that listens to all major language Wikipedias for anonymous edits from Congressional IP address ranges… and tweets them.

In less than 48 hours the @congressedits Twitter account had more than 3,000 followers. My friend Nick set up gccaedits for Canada using the same software … and @wikiAssemblee (France) and @RiksdagWikiEdit (Sweden) were quick to follow.

Image: Best Web Browser Extension by I Can Barely Draw. Select to embiggen.

mackenzie-destroyer-of-worlds:

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

I DIDNT REALIZE I NEEDED THIS IN MY LIFE

(via amgamble)

elizaevans:

sedgewina:

Now you can take out your aggression on the theatre world’s most inescapable, troll-like composer!

siamesemeg
etchpea:

g-go me

(Source: bunnyhepburn, via madamemaybe)